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CWAG Forum Saturday
Featured

05 August 2017  

Let’s have the Council and Mayor candidates talk about something different! How about water?

Here is the video from the CWAG forum. 

Councilman Steve Blair and Councilman Greg Lazzell were out of town and unable to attend. The rest of the candidates were all there. You can view the questions asked by CWAG below. 


If You Go Went:

What: CWAG Forum on Water
Who: Council and Mayor Candidates for the City of Prescott 
When: Saturday, August 5
Time: 10 AM
Where: Granite Peak Unitarian Universalist Congregation building, 882 Sunset Avenue (two blocks behind True Value).
Cost: Free


So, it is pretty well known where the Prescott Mayor and Council candidates stand on the issue of PSPRS and Prop 443. 

Just in case you’ve been super busy this summer and aren’t sure - Mary Beth Hrin (mayoral candidate) and Phil Goode (council candidate) are not supporting Prop 443. Greg Mengarelli and Jean Wilcox (mayoral candidates), Steve Blair, Connie Cantelme, Greg Lazzell, Alexa Scholl and Joseph Viccica (council candidates) do support Prop 443. 

But what about some of the other issues that face Prescott? One of the biggest issues that Prescott must solve for the long term is water. Where to find enough water to reach safe yield and support a slowly expanding community? 

The Citizen’s Water Advocacy Group (CWAG) will hold a water-specific forum today with the candidates. At this point, it looks like all candidates except Greg Lazzell will be in attendance. 

CWAG provides a list of the questions they plan to ask the candidates in advance. We’ll post them here, and update with the responses later.

CWAG Forum Questions

1. Please take 2 minutes to introduce yourself and very briefly state what measures related to water management and conservation, if any, you plan to propose to Council in 2018?

2. Building a pipeline from northwest of the town of Paulden and importing water from the Big Chino aquifer is currently Prescott’s strategy for increasing the city’s declining water supply.

Before the Big Chino Pipeline Project proceeds any further, should the City of Prescott hire a consultant to prepare a comprehensive study of potential alternative water sources which would include aggressive conservation, direct potable reuse of effluent,stormwater runoff collection and extensive rainwater harvesting?

3. The Verde River, the last major perennial river in Arizona, provides numerous recreational and environmental benefits, including habitat for endangered species, as well as 40% of Phoenix’s water. The current long-term study of the hydrological relationship between the Big Chino aquifer and the Upper Verde River is being undertaken (by the Salt River Project, Prescott Valley and the City of Prescott) to determine if implementation of the Big Chino Pipeline Project will require mitigation to prevent reduction in streamflow.

If the results of the study establish that the Pipeline Project will reduce the flow in the Upper Verde River, will you support a plan that will prevent the reduction, even if that protection doubles or triples the cost of the project?

4. Outdoor landscaping uses 27% of Prescott’s water (even more during the summer). This is water that is lost to evaporation and can’t be recycled. So far the City of Prescott has been quite successful in promoting conservation but CWAG has identified the potential for even greater savings through cost effective conservation measures.

Would you support changes to landscaping and construction guidelines that would result in additional water conservation?

5. In order to cover the significant costs of maintaining or replacing aging water and sewer infrastructure, the City of Prescott will soon need to substantially increase water rates.

If water rates go up, what can be done to ensure that the new rates are affordable for those residents who are already having a difficult time paying their utility bills? 

In particular, what do you think about applying most of any increase to the heaviest water users, thus keeping the base rate affordable?